Roatan Travel Guide

A outstanding scuba diving destination and cruise ship port-of-call, Roatan is the largest of the Bay Islands, that are placed within the Caribbean Sea off the east coast of Honduras. Favored for its stunning white beaches, turquoise waters and lush jungles teeming in exotic flowers and life, Roatan may be a tropical paradise abounding in both relaxation and adventure.

Tourists can find Roatan to be a combination of fashionable resorts, spirited cities and quiet villages, with standard communities like Coxen Hole, West End, French Harbour and West Bay that includes souvenir shops, restaurants and bars. usually known as the “Venice of the Caribbean,” Oak Ridge may be a picturesque fishing village of waterways, multicolored stilt houses and traditional customs.

Carnival Cruice PortSurrounded by the second-largest coral reef in the world, Roatan may be a prime spot for diving and snorkeling. What’s additional, the island’s beaches offer an array of activities from swimming to kayaking, paddle-boarding, fishing, dolphin-watching and glass-bottom boat tours. With Roatan’s botanical gardens,, coffee plantations and animal sanctuaries, tourists will encounter the island’s exotic flora, butterflies, agriculture and iguanas. In addition, the luxurious jungle offers adventures like ziplining, cover tours, whitewater rafting, horseback riding, cave-exploring and nature walks to view waterfalls and wildlife such as macaws, toucans and monkeys.

Shark DivingRoatan’s more populated towns are well supplied with restaurants and bars that feature a variety of choices from local Caribbean dishes to international cuisines. West End is the island’s main entertainment strip with the largest concentration of bars and clubs. Roatan can be reached by plane and cruise ship as well as by ferry boats from La Ceiba on Honduras’s mainland, while buses and water taxis are available to get people around the island.


Image by Barnaby,Mario A. Torres,docoverachiever Under Creative Common License.

Most Beautiful Parks to Explore

Hyde Park

No visit to London is complete withnot a visit to Hyde Park, one the city’s largest and most renowned parks. It’s renowned for demonstrations and also the Speaker’s Corner at one end of the park, and also the elegantly straight forward memorial fountain for Princess Diana at the opposite. In between, visitors can realize methods for walking, jogging or horseback riding, tennis courts, open water swimming, statues and monuments, and boating on the Serpentine on either a pedal boat or the solar shuttle.

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Stanley Park

Stanley Park has been delighting generations of Vancouverites since 1888, with its trails through the old-growth forests and on the mole of Vancouver Harbor. Others fill in awe of the tall totem poles designed to honor the indigenous first Nations, who lived on the land long before it became a park. Over the years, restaurants and an aquarium have been added, however the most-loved park remains otherwise comparatively unchanged. air the lookout for ducks, chipmunks, beaver and perhaps even a deer.

Ueno Park

Looking at Ueno Park nowadays, it’s hard to imagine that it’s built on the positioning of an impressive temple that was destroyed by warring factions within Japan within the nineteent hcentury. Today, this urban park sits prettily and serenely in central Tokio. it’s home to many museum’s and Japan’s first zoo. The most effective time to go to it, however, is in March and April the park’s quite 1,000 cherry trees are in bloom.

Jardin du Luxembourg

Known in English as the Luxembourg Gardens, this public park is that the second largest in Paris. Visitors here will picnic or stroll leisurely among lovely lawns, formal gardens and fruit orchards that feature artistic statues and fountains. For fun and sport, there are jogging paths, tennis courts and fitness equipment. kids will play within the large playground, ride ponies, watch a puppet play and sail model boats in an exceedingly lake.

Central Park

When viewing New York City from the air, Central Park stands out like a sore, or, rather, green thumb. This huge green rectangle in the center of Manhattan, filled with massive trees, lakes and buildings, is surrounded by monotonously colored skyscrapers. Dating back to the 19th century, it is the nation’s first public park, drawing 40 million visitors annually. The park’s features are mind-boggling; statues, memorials, fountains, lakes for boating, bridges to cross, a castle, walking paths, gorgeous landscaping and more.

Charms of Charleston: Top 5 Things to Do in South Carolina’s Oldest City

As one of southern America’s most vibrant urban centers, Charleston boasts an array of significant sites. The struggles of the Civil War have left a lasting impression on the city, but a remarkable selection of antebellum treasures stand to this day and lend Charleston much of its antique charm. Consider adding these five sites to your vacation itinerary for a memorable taste of South Carolina’s cultural capital.

1. Fort Sumter National Monument

Top 5 Things to Do in South Carolina's Oldest City

As one of the United States’ most striking and informative Civil War memorials, Fort Sumter National Monument marks the spot where Union and Confederate armies clashed for the first time in 1861. A historic sea fort, it is only accessible by boat, so start your visit at the education center where you’ll pick up ferry tickets. Once on site, you can listen to a short lecture about the chain of events that led to the first shots being fired here. Examine the defenses and imagine the brutal conflict, which included a 34-hour bombardment by Confederate forces. To learn more about the Civil War and significance of Fort Sumter, visit the on-site museum.

2. Drayton Hall

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The country’s oldest plantation house still open to the public, Drayton Hall provides a valuable insight into the life of 18th-century Charleston’s upper classes alongside the dark history of slavery. The striking building, featuring classical Palladian architecture, looks much as it did when it was completed in 1752 which has earned it National Historic Landmark status. Embark on a guided tour to learn about the seven generations of Draytons who lived here, their servants, and their slaves. Believing strongly in the authenticity of the site, the owners have not modernized or furnished the house, however genuine relics such as teapots and copper slave tags can be viewed. Complete your Charleston trip with a walk through the picturesque Victorian gardens.

3. Waterfront Park

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Make time for relaxation on your trip by visiting Charleston’s beloved Waterfront Park. The 5-hectare (12-acre) area straddles the Carolina coastline, providing stunning views year-round. Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the grounds, passing landscaped gardens, brightly colored flower beds, and impressive fountains. Watch for the unusual pineapple fountain–a favorite among locals and visitors alike. Once you’ve finished exploring, rest your legs in the shade of an oak tree or on one of the plentiful benches, or grab a bite at one of the seafront restaurants (where favorite flavors include shrimp and grits).

4. The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist

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Combining rich history, beautiful architecture, and a serene atmosphere, the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist draws sightseers as a prime place to visit. The grand brownstone building, completed in 1907, features impressive Neo-Gothic architecture but is best known for its one-of-a-kind Franz Mayer and Co. stained-glass windows. Spend time admiring their vivid colors and examining the illustrations, including local coats of arms and elaborate depictions of bible scenes. Since the cathedral serves as an active Roman Catholic church, you can attend mass and religious concerts here; use a trip planner and check the schedule online.

5. Battery Park and White Point Gardens

Today a pleasant green space, Battery Park and White Point Gardens served as part of Charleston’s defensive system in the American Civil War. Oak trees, monuments, and flower-filled bushes have largely taken the place of armaments and fierce fortifications here, but you can still view a number of historic mortars and cannons used during the conflict. Take a tour of the verdant park’s many monuments, which reveals much about the area’s past, including a marker of where a pirate captain and his crew were hung around 300 years ago and the bust of hometown hero W.G. Simms. The 2.3-hectare (nearly 6-acre) gardens’ surroundings are just as much part of the attraction as what lies within–stately antebellum houses with views of the Atlantic Ocean.