Four Foods I want to Make in their Home Countries – Part 2

As soon as I got done the first part about food I want to make, I immediately began part two because… well… I’m hungry now and far too poor/impatient to actually do any of this. Take a look at the next four foods I’d love to learn how to make in their home countries and begin salivating with me.

Oh… and probably check out part 3 which will likely follow this incredibly shortly!

Gumbo – Louisiana, USA

I have made gumbo many a time but no matter how great I think it is, I know it doesn’t hold a candle to the ones served up down in the bayou. To be fair, gumbo isn’t that much different then soup but it’s the dirtying up of the vegetables that adds the extra element that makes it unique. Just like making chilli or some sort of marinade for ribs or chicken wings, gumbo recipes are heavily guarded secrets – so wouldn’t it be fantastic to learn some of the tips from the pros?

Bread – France

The French have a sensational culinary history but it’s their baked goods that seem to be in a realm of their own. Fresh, hot bread can be made by anyone with a bread maker or the patience to make it themselves in the oven, but I’d like to see how the expert French bakers, the ones who spend their lives making it in a wood stove, do it. Then maybe I can come back home and put everyone else to shame with their store bought stale loaves.

Really, any of this would be amazeballs

Really, any of this would be amazeballs

Tom Yum Soup – Thailand

Thai food is another one of those types of cuisine that I really have no clue which one I would prefer over another but seeing as everyone would likely say pad thai or spring rolls, I’m going to go with my personal favourite – Tom Yum soup. It’s a spicy, sour soup that warms the soul and has more distinct flavours than my tastebuds know what to do with. I’ve never attempted to make it at home as it feels like sacrilege, but if I had the right pointers, maybe I would.

Curry – India

There are so many curry dishes I enjoy that I really have no idea which one to start with. I think what I would like most to get out of learning from the curry professionals is what goes into making a good curry base? I recently started making my own pastes rather than buying them and I’ve noticed the quality in the cooking has skyrocketed to the point of I almost don’t feel any need to go out for it anymore – the only thing holding me back is an inability to make proper naan. Such is life…

Four Foods I Want to Make in their Home Countries

One of my favourite things about travelling is eating, which is why it’s surprising that I’m not larger than I am because as a substitute for the former I tend to do the latter. For places I have been to, it’s a chance to revisit the feeling I had while being there and for those I haven’t been, it’s to dream up future excursions.

With this in mind, it isn’t enough just to eat the food in the native country but to learn how to prepare it properly. It’s not hard to pick up a cookbook on international cooking or watch a cooking show and get the knowledge that way, but there’s something very different about learning how to do it right at the source. Wouldn’t that make a great memory in itself?

Below is a short list of some of the food I’d love to make in the country that it’s known for – keep in mind, I will probably make a second edition of this topic as there are a lot of things I want to make and eat!

Yes please!

Yes please!

Sushi – Japan

When I spent time in Japan, I never learned how to make sushi – something I only kind of regret. The reason I didn’t and only partially regret not doing it is because sushi is so highly valued over there and it’s so plentiful that it was better to just buy it then to butcher it. If I could get the chance to study with a sushi master and skip the 10-year dish washing apprenticeship part, I think that would be an excellent experience.

Meatballs – Sweden

Despite all the jokes about horse meat in the meatballs at IKEA (which, in many countries around the world, isn’t a big deal), I’d like to see what goes into making the Swedes such experts at making these seemingly simple creations. Is it the sauce? The aging? Is there some secret ingredient that I might as well give up trying to find? I must know!

Lasagne – Italy

It’s fair to say the Italians wrote the book on great food and deciding on just one thing to make is an exercise in futility, but I think I’d like to see how to make a great lasagne. I’ve had some fantastic ones in my day and also some watery, soupy, bland disasters. What is the key to a perfect pasta dish that likely isn’t as terrible for you as most would think it to be?

Poutine – Quebec, Canada

I have to be region specific with this as poutine can be found almost everywhere in Canada but it originates from the French province of Quebec. For those of you who don’t know what poutine is, it is french fries, cheese curds and gravy – and is just as fantastic as  it sounds. Sometimes you can even get smoked meat on top of it, thus earning it the title of ‘heart attack in a box’. Unless the cheese squeaks, it’s not fresh enough and if the gravy comes from a powder you should hang your head in shame – there is a method and I must learn it one day.