How To Spend a Weeks in Spain

Spain evokes pictures of castanets and flamenco dancers, tapas and late night dinners, and also the Alhambra within the moonlight. What wonderful memories you’ll create in this historic piece of realty on the Iberian Peninsula! If you’re under time constraints, a weeks in Spain is enough time to permit you to soak up the history, delights and treasures of this Mediterranean country. Of course, you’ll need to go to cities in numerous regions to offer you a broad sampling of what Spain needs to offer. Can’t see all of Spain in a weeks? Not to worry; this is one country that will definitely charm you into a return visit.

Barcelona (2 nights)

We begin our one weeks in Spain in city, the ancient city on the Mediterranean Sea that has strong ties to the art world through Picasso and Miro. It’s noted for its architecture from Roman to medieval to Catalan. Simply choose a location and begin walking; you never know what you’ll come across. The city’s old quarter is stuffed with these centuries-old buildings. Examples of architect Anton Gaudi’s works may be found throughout town, as well as Parc Guell and Casa Mila. La Rambla is that the city’s noted shopping, dining and entertainment street. For a refreshing break, build a little sun bathing time on the beach into your schedule.

Tarragona (stopover)

If Roman ruins are your passion, you’ll definitely want to stop over in Tarragona en route from Barcelona to Valencia. The city has the second best collection of Roman ruins in Spain. Imagine gladiators in combat as you tour the Tarraco Archeological Site, stop at the ancient seaside amphitheater or marvel at the city walls built over the centuries. If you’re hungry, Tarragona is famous for calcotada (grilled spring onions) and xato, a salad made from cod and escarole.

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Valencia (2 nights)

Valencia, Spain’s third largest town, was supported by the Romans more than 2,100 years ago, but this past has given way to more modern things. This includes the architectural wonder referred to as the town of Arts and Sciences, home to Europe’s largest aquarium. Another must-see is that the Barrio del Carmen, a set of medieval buildings that line cobblestone streets between the Islam and Christian walls. Pick up fixings for a picnic lunch at the Mercado Central, said to be Europe’s longest running market. It’s over 1,000 stalls providing foods of every kind, souvenirs and therefore the like. Enjoy your purchases while strolling or biking through the Turia Gardens.

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Toledo (2 nights)

Before leaving home, you’ll need to travel into training for your visit to Toledo, a famed medieval town designed atop and down a hill. Comfortable walking shoes are a must to navigate the narrow cobblestone streets that teem with Old World charm. A must-see is that the ornate thirteenth century Gothic Cathedral of Toledo with its fifteen chapels and fabulous art, as well as paintings by El Greco and Velazquez. Another religious must-see is the Synagogue of El Transito, a fourteenth century building that’s considered the finest Spanish-Jewish art in Spain. Over the centuries, it also served as a Catholic church and military headquarters, and is now a museum. Old Toledo overlooks the Tagus River, offering great views of New Toledo.


Image by  Baz Richardson, dimaruss34 under CC License>